August132011

6df Galaxy Survey fly through (by ICRAR)

The 6dF Galaxy Survey has collected more than 120,000 redshifts over the southern sky over a 5 year period from 2001 to 2005. Its goal is to map our southern view of the local universe, and use the peculiar motions of one-tenth of the survey to measure galaxy mass. It covers more than eight times the sky area of the successful 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey.

Something was apparently borked about the embed code from the alternate source, so I went back and got the embed code from Vimeo. However, here’s what my original source had to say:

How fast is the universe expanding? We could give you a number, but it’d be meaningless to those of you who aren’t Stephen Hawking. So here’s a video. Prepare to have your mind blown straight into orbit…

The film visualizes what’s said to be the most accurate model for measuring the expansion of the universe. The model, produced at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), in Australia, is based off of the Hubble constant and a massive trove of data on galaxies called the 6dF Galaxy Survey.

Also, a shout out to jtotheizzoe who posted it first.

August52011
abcstarstuff:

If you’ve never bothered checking my show out, why not down load an episode and see if you like it…
StarStuff episode 540 is now out Listen to it on the best ABC radio stations in Australia. On Science 360 Radio in the United States. On line as audio on demand and as a podcast at: http://www.abc.net.au/science/starstuff
Trojan Earth Astronomers have discovered a Trojan asteroid sharing Earth’s orbit around the Sun.  it’s the first time a Trojan’s been found in Earth orbit, and the tiny world may have been there -unseen- for thousands of years.
Volcanos on the Moon Scientists have found evidence of volcanos on the far side of the moon. The discovery means the Moon was still geologically active much later than previously thought.
Sizing up the Universe Scientists have developed one of the most accurate measurements ever made of how fast the universe is expanding.  The new research will help cosmologists better understand how the cosmos is evolving and how it will change over time.
Hunting for the Higgs U.S. scientists expect to establish within months whether or not the Higgs boson, the so called “god particle” actually exists. Meanwhile European physicists say they now know everything about the Higgs except whether it’s real.
Juno go for launch All systems are go for this week’s launch of NASA’s next mission to the giant gas planet Jupiter. The bus sized Juno spacecraft should reach the Jovian system in July 2016. Dragon given green light to dock with ISS The SpaceX Dragon will be the first privately operated spacecraft to dock with the International Space Station. The Mission slated for November 30 will be a test run before SpaceX begins shipping cargo and maybe eventually crew to the orbiting outpost.
ISS De-orbit plans Russia says it plans to de-orbit the International Space Station after 2020. The announcement was made despite construction of the orbiting outpost still 10 months from completion.
Russian Soyuz replacement Moscow says its eventual replacement for the Soyuz will be capable of carrying up to six cosmonauts to the International Space Station, or crews of four to the Moon. The new reusable capsule will have its first test flight in 2015.Delta 4 launch The United States has carried out its 50th successful launch of a GPS navigation satellite. The Delta 4 rocket blasted into space carrying a new generation version of the satellite designed to provide improved telemetry.Third time lucky for Russian launch The Russian Space Agency Roskosmos has launched six American telecommunications satellites on a Soyuz rocket for Arianespace. The flight had been postponed twice previously due to technical glitches.
Another Chinese military satellite launched  Two launches in two weeks as China places another satellite into orbit as part of Beijing’s rapidly expanding military program.
The Science Report New evidence backs circumcision to fight HIV-AIDS Mobile use doesn’t alter kids’ cancer risk-study New way to treat the most aggressive breast cancer type Archaeopteryx just another dinosaur with feathers Golden bell discovered in ancient Israel http://www.abc.net.au/science/starstuff


I love this podcast. The host, Stuart Gary, brings an avuncular exuberance to every topic he covers. You can tell he’s into the subject matter, and his enthusiasm and professional approach are exactly what you’d want in a podcast that covers such a diversity of stories. Highly recommended.

abcstarstuff:

If you’ve never bothered checking my show out, why not down load an episode and see if you like it…

StarStuff episode 540 is now out
Listen to it on the best ABC radio stations in Australia.
On Science 360 Radio in the United States.
On line as audio on demand and as a podcast at:
http://www.abc.net.au/science/starstuff

Trojan Earth
Astronomers have discovered a Trojan asteroid sharing Earth’s orbit around the Sun. it’s the first time a Trojan’s been found in Earth orbit, and the tiny world may have been there -unseen- for thousands of years.

Volcanos on the Moon
Scientists have found evidence of volcanos on the far side of the moon. The discovery means the Moon was still geologically active much later than previously thought.

Sizing up the Universe
Scientists have developed one of the most accurate measurements ever made of how fast the universe is expanding. The new research will help cosmologists better understand how the cosmos is evolving and how it will change over time.

Hunting for the Higgs
U.S. scientists expect to establish within months whether or not the Higgs boson, the so called “god particle” actually exists. Meanwhile European physicists say they now know everything about the Higgs except whether it’s real.

Juno go for launch
All systems are go for this week’s launch of NASA’s next mission to the giant gas planet Jupiter. The bus sized Juno spacecraft should reach the Jovian system in July 2016.

Dragon given green light to dock with ISS

The SpaceX Dragon will be the first privately operated spacecraft to dock with the International Space Station. The Mission slated for November 30 will be a test run before SpaceX begins shipping cargo and maybe eventually crew to the orbiting outpost.

ISS De-orbit plans
Russia says it plans to de-orbit the International Space Station after 2020. The announcement was made despite construction of the orbiting outpost still 10 months from completion.

Russian Soyuz replacement
Moscow says its eventual replacement for the Soyuz will be capable of carrying up to six cosmonauts to the International Space Station, or crews of four to the Moon. The new reusable capsule will have its first test flight in 2015.

Delta 4 launch
The United States has carried out its 50th successful launch of a GPS navigation satellite. The Delta 4 rocket blasted into space carrying a new generation version of the satellite designed to provide improved telemetry.

Third time lucky for Russian launch
The Russian Space Agency Roskosmos has launched six American telecommunications satellites on a Soyuz rocket for Arianespace. The flight had been postponed twice previously due to technical glitches.

Another Chinese military satellite launched
Two launches in two weeks as China places another satellite into orbit as part of Beijing’s rapidly expanding military program.

The Science Report
New evidence backs circumcision to fight HIV-AIDS
Mobile use doesn’t alter kids’ cancer risk-study
New way to treat the most aggressive breast cancer type
Archaeopteryx just another dinosaur with feathers
Golden bell discovered in ancient Israel

http://www.abc.net.au/science/starstuff

I love this podcast. The host, Stuart Gary, brings an avuncular exuberance to every topic he covers. You can tell he’s into the subject matter, and his enthusiasm and professional approach are exactly what you’d want in a podcast that covers such a diversity of stories. Highly recommended.

(Source: starstuffblog)

August42011

The Adventure of a Lifetime

kaiyves:

janf:

This…

…goes up:

Then drops away this…

…like this:

Then lights and discards this…

…so it can take these guys:

And put them in a loop around this big rock…

…so two of them can get into this spider thing…

…and go down here, like this…

…so these guys can get out…


…and get back into the spacecraft occupied by this guy:

And then they get back in here and go up…

…and fly towards here:

Then get warmed up a little…

…and touchdown like this

Yes.

That is greatness.

(Source: j-b-a, via starstuffblog)

August22011

peteuplink:

‘As the Asteroid Turns’ (by JPLnews)

See asteroid Vesta spin before your very eyes.


(via starstuffblog)

5AM

jtotheizzoe:

New images from Vesta

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft entered orbit around the asteroid Vesta on July 15. It will stay in orbit there for about a year before heading on to another asteroid, Ceres, in 2015. Click here for an infographic all about the Dawn mission.

Today, NASA released the first full frame view of Vesta (at the top). Click here to explore some hi-res versions.

(images via NASA)

Breathtaking! Four years to get a spacecraft there, and now it’s in orbit. Wow. I can’t wait to hear what they learn about Vesta’s makeup, features, and history. What a tale that asteroid has to tell. And this is but Part One of the story.

(Source: jtotheizzoe, via starstuffblog)

August12011
July312011
July302011
ohmysagan:

Pluto and it’s largest moon, Charon, compared with the United States

ohmysagan:

Pluto and it’s largest moon, Charon, compared with the United States

(via likeaphysicist)

July282011
astronomicalconsiderations:

USAUSAUSA.
No but really, good job to everybody involved.

astronomicalconsiderations:

USAUSAUSA.

No but really, good job to everybody involved.

(via likeaphysicist)

July242011
dendroica:

The sun shines above the Earth’s horizon with the International Space Station in the foreground in this photo taken by spacewalker Ron Garan during the final spacewalk while a shuttle is docked to the station Picture: REUTERS / NASA (via Pictures of the day: 15 July 2011 - Telegraph)

dendroica:

The sun shines above the Earth’s horizon with the International Space Station in the foreground in this photo taken by spacewalker Ron Garan during the final spacewalk while a shuttle is docked to the station Picture: REUTERS / NASA (via Pictures of the day: 15 July 2011 - Telegraph)

1PM

CASSINI MISSION (by Chris Abbas)

When it comes to the Cassini Mission and Saturn (with it’s amazing moons), this is one of the most beautifully crafted works you’re likely to see. I recommend watching it in full screen glory, in a darkened room, with the volume turned up (for Nine Inch Nails’ ambient piece, “2 Ghosts I, Ghosts I-IV”). I only wish it could last longer… forever, even. Otherwise it’s perfect.

July232011

peteuplink:

Mars Science Laboratory Landing Site: Gale crater (by JPLnews)

Soar over the crater on Mars that will be the landing site for NASA’s Curiosity rover.

(via starstuffblog)

July202011

todaysdocument:

This photoset is from the Gemini X Mission which took place from July 18-21, 1966.  In our catalog, you can view 347 images from this mission. 

The photos above were taken on July 19, 1966 and include images of Africa, Florida, Hurricane Celia, the inside of Gemini X, and clouds.  

(via silas216)

1PM

spacettf:

Neil Armstrong: one giant leap for mankind (by nexus6j)

The day the world united..

Of note:

It was the year of the Beatles psychedelic album, The Yellow Submarine, and it was the year the Beatles performed together for the last time. It was also the year John and Yoko got married and sang “Give Peace A Chance”. Russia launched a spacecraft, the Venera 6, which parachuted onto Venus. The year saw a lot of Soviet space exploration, including a space rendezvous between Soyuz 4 and 5 and the first crew transfer in space. Led Zeppelin’s first album debuted. Nixon was inaugurated and soon promised to end the Vietnam war. Jim Morrison was arrested for allegedly exposing himself in public. Yasser Arafat became the head of the PLO, and shortly thereafter the PLO would attack an El-Al plane in Zurich. The US launched Mariner 6 for a fly-by of Mars. The first clinical transplant of a fully artificial heart was performed on a dying man. The patient was later given a human heart transplant, but died of complications. Under the Nixon administration, the U.S. began bombing eastern Cambodia and Laos in an effort to deter North Vietnamese offensives. The mission, called Operation Menu, was a covert one that put the Nixon administration in hot water. It failed to accomplish its goals. Norman Mailer won the Pulitzer for Armies of the Night. The first color pictures of the earth as seen from space were beamed to earth from the Apollo 10. Apollo 10 also made it into the Guinness Book of World Records for the highest speed attained by a manned vehicle: 39,897 km/h (11.08 km/s or 24,791 mph). The comedy troupe, Monty Python, formed. The Who release their rock opera, Tommy. On the 16th of July, the Apollo 11 was launched. On the 19th, it entered into orbit around the moon. While Armstrong and Aldrin walked on the surface of the moon on the 20th, an unmanned Russian spacecraft, Luna 15, was orbiting the moon. It crashed a few hours before the astronauts lifted off. The day before the astronauts returned home, the Soviets tested yet another nuclear bomb. Vietnam and the Cold War were years from being over.

1PM
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